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blast. >>> still one more note about terrorism tonight. india's prime minister says that he has "credible information" -- his words -- that militant groups in pakistan are planning new attacks on his country. last november, 166 people were killed in mumbai in an operation apparently conceived and organized in pakistan. >>> the talk of india today was the detention over the weekend by customs officials at newark airport of one of india's most famous actors, shah rukh khan. khan is a muslim and his name came up on a computer alert list. many indians like gayatri goswami of mumbai expressed outrage. she writes -- "the detention was shameful. the u.s. shoulapologize. they better." but others were much more understanding. one indian man implored his countrymen. wake up, india. wake up. it's time for tight security. i would appreciate it if india takes similar actions against each and every person who enters and exits india. >>> and another sign tonight that the global recession seems to be ending. at least the worst of it. japan, the world's second largest economy, announced today th
to death in india for planting bombs that killed 52 in the city of mumbai in 2003. all three were convicted last week six years after bombs exploded at the gateway of india monument in the main corridor. our correspondent there reports now. >> the attack in mumbai in august 2003 was the victim. the bombs were planted inside two taxis. one detonated as -- at the city's main jewelry market at the height of the business hour, leaving behind a trail of destruction. the second at the city's main landmark. it was the gateway of india. more than 50 people were killed and nearly 180 wounded. last week, a special anti-terror court convicted this man, his wife, and usherethis person of planting the bombs. they stood in court as the judge handed them the death penalty. all three have pleaded not guilty and are expected to appeal against the sentence. their trial took place in high security and under a powerful anti-terrorism law that no longer exists. prosecutors argued that the bombings were carefully planned and were an act of extreme brutality. all three deserved the harsh sentence, they said. the
in print. one of the documentaries we did was in india. it was a very interesting story that we are going to go with that had to do with a group of women in a little village who had organized themselves and built a road to their village. these were women who had taught themselves how to do this work, and then confronted the men and ended up getting the men to pay them for the work. we decided that was a story we cannot do on radio, because no one spoke english. we did all the interviews the translation and reviewed all the tapes and said we just cannot put this on air, because people will be listening to half an hour of language they do not understand. >> how have you found your time being spent, now that you do this plus your column? >> audio and radio work is very time-consuming. there are lots of things to pull together. probably the last year i have spent more time doing audio work than anything else. this year i suspect i will flip a little bit and devote more time to print. i am about to start working on a new book as well. >> what is it about? >> i wrote a book close to 15 years ag
countries - brazil, russia and india. the bric four was actually once expected to reshape the global economy. but in today's extraordinary climate, that seems like wishful thinking in better times. this is the growth expected from china; while in neighbouring india, the economic fundamentals are also strong. but brazil has stumbled with no clear growth expected until 2010; and as for russia - over reliant on high commodity prices it now risks the spectre of high inflation and high unemployment. and the bric fault lines don't only concern numbers. for its members are fierce competitors and serious mistrust abounds - which is a barrier to enhancing trade and economic cooperation. >>zweig: well the chinese don't trust the indians at all. the indians don't trust the chinese. the 1962 border war seared, forever seared, the brains of indian policy makers. brazilian businessmen complain, over the last couple of years that china came - hu jintao the leader of china visited - promised all kinds of money, left - and then everybody said, where's the money? >>reporter: it's one of those strange historic
of pakistan's neighbors, and i think of india. what do you make of india's stopping that ship? all we know right now is that they found, like, 60,000 pounds of sugar. they are still looking at it, but what do you make of india stopping that north korean ship? >> india is imposing the security council resolution, and i think it is a very positive sign. india has been very cooperative with us, and they had very many parallel interests with respect -- they have a very many parallel interests with respect to terrorism and with respect to the nuclear danger -- they have very many parallel interests. greta: am i wrong to be suspicious that north korea might have been being a little coy? because sending that ship off in the direction that they did, knowing that someone was likely to stop it, and having 16,000 tons of sugar sort of makes the stopping country look, well, wrong, for one. >> nobody knows what the north koreans have on the ships. if north korea, a country that has no significant economy, that has no close relations with any other country in the economic field, if they can get away wit
by customs oicials at newark aiort of one of india's most famous actors, sharukh khan. khan is a muslim and his ne came uon a computer alert list. many indians likgayatri goswami of mumbai expresd outrage. she writes -- he detention was shameful. the u.s. sulapologize. they better." but others wermuch more undersnding. one indian man implored hi countrymen wake up, india. wake u it time for tight security. i would appreciate iif india takes milar actions against each and every person whenters and exits dia. >>> and another si tonight that t global recession seems to be ending. at leasthe worst of it. japan, the world's second largeseconomy, announced today that its economyrew at an annual rate of 3.7% in t cond quarter. helped along by an increase exportto china. you'll recall that the econoes ofermany and france also rebounded ring the last quarter. spite all of this though, stock markets fell srply around theorld today. >>> and now to the middle ea ident hosni mubak is in washinon for high-level talks with obama admintration officials. and amera has a lot riding on mubarak. the united
blake and i were in india recently and the indians are a major factor in the region. they're the dominant power. improveb -- improving u.s.-indian relations ha been a continual goal of the last three u.s.strations, all which i think have been successful in that regard, starting with president clinton's trip in 2000. i will keep the indians fully informed and i have an indian counterpart who i keep fully informed in india. >> ok. going to open it up. [unaudible question] >> i'm not going to stand so i don't block the cameras. >> please identify yourself. >> martha raddatz from abc news. ambassador holebook i know you want to talk about the civilian side of this. >> but you don't? >> but the security is so intergind. tell me how that is affecting what you're trying to do, what kind of a hindrance that is, what hads to happen in order for you to succeed and as part of that i want to sigh that a lot of people i talk to, civilians in afghanistan complain that they really can't go outside the wire in certain areas because of the security. >> you mean the americans? >> yes. >> le
. they looked at the impact of floods in countries like india and parts of asia, what it would have on neighboring countries. guest: if you think about water as our most important life support system and the vehicle through which we'll feel the impacts of climate change whether it's drought, desertification, seasonality of rivers, where before they ran year-round, all of that is going to change the world as we know it. host: we will get to viewer phone calls in a moment. i want to give folks a look at some of what blue august is about on planet green this month. here's a look. >> the ocean needs our help. time is running out. >> people have heard about global warming for years but it is only the past five years that experts really understood that carbon dioxide is causing problems for the oceans as well. what is worrisome it has not been on the radar. >> in a few decades it will profoundly altered oceans chemistry, rapidly making the water more acidic. >> scientists have demonstrated that if we continue to pollute as we are now, the ocean as said it will double by the end of the cen
's main landmark, the gateway of india. more than 50 people were killed and nearly 180 were wounded. last week, a special court convicted two men and a woman of planting the bombs. outside, the main prosecution lawyer had this to say. >> this decision is very important and it will send a strong signal to anyone who wants to engage in this kind of illegal activity costing the lives of the innocent population. >> a judge handed them the death penalty. all three have pleaded not guilty and are expected to appeal against the sentence. their trial took place in high security and under a powerful anti-terrorism law that no longer exists. prosecutors argued that the bombings were carefully planned arab -- and or an act of extreme brutality. all three deserve the harsh sentence, they said. the bombings were said to be in retaliation of anti-muslim riots in 2002. all three are said to be members of a pakistani militants group accused of carrying out last year's mumbai attacks, which has increased friction between india and pakistan. >> just a footnote there, pakistan issued a global alert for 13 s
swine flu worldwide. this week, india confirmed its first death, a teenage girl. the announcement led to panic and scuffle. a new trial started in moscow over the killing of the investigative journalist, a staunch critic of the kremlin. the retrial was necessary after an overturned acquittal of the three men accused of involvement in the killing. huge crowds turned out in the philippines as they paid their last respects to be former president. she led the power up writing in 1986. an indian court sentenced two men and women to death for their part in the mumbai bombings of 2003 which killed 52 and injured hundreds. investigators said that all three had links to a pakistan- based terrorist group. more details from delhi. >> the attack in 2003 was devastating. bombs were planted inside two taxis. one detonated at the city's main jewelry market at the height of the business hours, leaving behind a trail of destruction. the second of the mainland parks, the gateway of india. more than 50 people were killed, and nearly 118 wounded. last week, courts convicted the three suspects of planting
. the second, at the city's main ndmark, the gateway of india. more than 50 people we killed and nearly 0 were wounded. last week, a special court nvicted two men and a woman of pnting the bombs. outside, the main prosecution lawyer had this to say >> this decision is very important anit will send a strong signalo anye wo wants to engage in this kind of illelactivity costing the lives of the innoct population. > a judge handed them the death penalty. all three have plead not guilty andre expected to appeal againsthe sentence. their trial took place in high serity and under a poweul anti-terrorism law that no nger exists. prosecuts argued that the bombings were carefully planned arab -- and orn act of extreme brutality. all three deserve e harsh sentence, ty said. the bombings were saido be in retaliati of anti-muslim riots in 2002. all threare said to be members of a pakiani militants group accused of carrying out last year's mumbai aacks, whichas increased iction between india and pakistan. >> jt a footnote ther kistanssued a global alert or 13 suspects in connection with last year's mumbai a
. the other was that the main landmark, the gateway to india. more than 50 were killed, nearly 180 wounded. last week, a special court connected -- convicted three individuals of plotting bombings. outside court, the main prosecution lawyer had this to say. >> this decision is very important and will give us [inaudible] illegal activity, taking the lives of the innocent. >> today, the judge handed out the death penalty. all three pled not guilty, and are expected to appeal the sentence. they're trying to place under high security and a powerful anti-terrorism law that no longer exists. prosecutors argued that the bombings were carefully planned and an act of extreme brutality. all three deserve the hearts sentence, they say. the bombings were said to be retaliation for anti-muslim riots in 2002. all three are said to be members of a band pakistani militant group accused of carrying out last year's mumbai attacks, which led to increased tension between india and pakistan. >> just a footnote, pakistan has asked the international police agency interpol to issue a global alert for 13 suspects
-- question was on the geography between pakistan and india. is it critical that the united states try to play a role? that's on really problematic with respect to the indians in terms of defusing tensions between india and pakistan. is that outside 9 postal -- the portfolio of this group? >> it is outside the portfolio of my job. on the other hand, i am in constant touch with the indians. i met with the indians continually. the new ambassador in washington and i have had dinner recently and she and i are in close touch. i go to indio whenever the schedule permits. i stress we're completely transparent. the secretary of state and my close colleague assistant secretary for south asia, central asian affairs bob blake and i were in india recently and the indians are a major factor in the region. they're the dominant power. improveb -- improving u.s.-indian relations ha been a continual goal of the last three u.s.strations, all which i think have been successful in that regard, starting with president clinton's trip in 2000. i will keep the indians fully informed and i have an indian counterpart w
, israel, india and pakistan, they are not bound by the treaty, but iran is. iran violated that treaty in approximate a series of approximate a series of differen iran has been sanctioned by the united nations for those violations. the sanctions are too weak to cause a change in iran's behavior, but at least it it demonstrates iran has violated the treaty responsibilities. the fact is that while iran has the right to develop electricity from nuclear power plants, they are flaring their natural gas they could generate electricity for a couple kilo watt. >> host: why are they? >> guest: they have no way to export it, liquiified natural gas plant to markets. >> host: back to afghanistan, full page, photograph for afghans, a new test of democracy, their presidential election. their elections are coming up in 10 days, i believe august 20th. what are your hopes for the election? >> guest: a fair and free election would be outstanding step toward building afghanistan as a state. i can't tell you that i'd vote for this candidate or that can d candidate? >> host: is karz ai the best candid
of the europeans and particularly in conquered india, as the prime concern. we can easily think of m blocks today. hits observation in fact is one of the few solid and enduring principles of international and domestic affairs. well to keep in mind. at the food crisis is a case in point. it erupted first and most dramatically in haiti in the early 2008, and like bangladesh, haiti is a symbol of the utter misery. like bangladesh, when the european explorers arrived, they said they were stunned because it was so remarkably rich in resources. later it became the source of much of france's wealth. i am not going to run through this sordid history but the current food crisis traces back directly to woodrow wilson's invasion of haiti, which was murderous and brutal and destructive. among wilson's many crimes was to dissolve the haitian parliament at gunpoint, because if refused to pass what was called progressive legislation which would allow u.s. businesses to take over haitian lance. wilson marines then ran a free election in which the legislation was passed by 99.9% of the vote. that is of the 5% of
and india. is it critical that the united states try to play a role? that's on really problematic with respect to the indians in terms of defusing tensions between india and pakistan. is that outside 9 postal -- the portfolio of this group? >> it is outside the portfolio of my job. on the other hand, i am in constant touch with the indians. i met with the indians continually. the new ambassador in washington and i have had dinner recently and she and i are in close touch. i go to indio whenever the schedule permits. i stress we're completely transparent. the secretary of state and my close colleague assistant secretary for south asia, central asian affairs bob blake and i were in india recently and the indians are a major factor in the region. they're the dominant power. improveb -- improving u.s.-indian relations ha been a continual goal of the last three u.s.strations, all which i think have been successful in that regard, starting with president clinton's trip in 2000. i will keep the indians fully informed and i have an indian counterpart who i keep fully informed in india. >>
code crime, wearing a pair of pants for which she faces 40 lashes. >>> and from india, a human rights group charged today that the police system in that country needs some major overhaul to meet international standards. human rights watch said that while india is modernizing rapidly the police continue to use old methods including abuse and threats. it said the police sometimes detained people illegally, torture and kill suspects and refused to investigate crimes against the politically powerful. the indian government had no immediate response. >>> was the british government complicit in the torture of terror suspects in a secret work conducted by western intelligent agencies over the last eight years? that question was raised after the release of a pakistani man ben yan mohammed from american custody at guantanamo bay, cuba. when mohammed returned to britain, he sued the government in a test case claiming the intelligence agency, miify was involved in his investigations while government claims its got nothing to hard a parliamentary commission is now calling for an independent invest
, india and pakistan, they are not bound by the treaty, but iran is. iran violated that treaty in approximate a series of different respects and iran has been sanctioned by the united nations for those violations. the sanctions are too weak to cause a change in iran's behavior, but at least it it demonstrates iran has violated the treaty responsibilities. the fact is that while iran has the right to develop electricity from nuclear power plants, they are flaring their natural gas they could generate electricity for a couple kilo watt. >> host: why are they? >> guest: they have no way to export it, liquiified natural gas plant to markets. >> host: back to afghanistan, full page, photograph for afghans, a new test of democracy, their presidential election. their elections are coming up in 10 days, i believe august 20th. what are your hopes for the election? >> guest: a fair and free election would be outstanding step toward building afghanistan as a state. i can't tell you that i'd vote for this candidate or that can d candidate? >> host: is karz ai the best candidate to hav
. if we do the decent thing, the nuclear arsenal will be hard. greta: and do what? india is next door. they hate each other. what can we do? >> the military is called the steel skeleton because it is the one institution that holds the country together. we need to make sure does not turn against us. it is not anything we can do in a few days or few months. if we lose the struggle and the radicals takeover, they have dozens or hundreds of nuclear weapons to use against india. the stakes in pakistan are very high, higher than afghanistan or iraq. greta: we hear the nuclear arsenal is safe and under control. i do know why, but i do not feel comfortable with that. can the committee that is true? he was like the walmart and nuclear weapons. he was giving a clear weapons all over the world to north korea, syria. he is a hero in number three. the worst thing they did was give him a house arrest. >> >> i dealt with that when those in the government. from a technical point of view, it is unlikely you will have an accidental detonation of nuclear weapons. greta: i'm not worried about that. >> th
we do? i know the nuclear arsenal is terrifying, and you've got india next door and they hate each other, but what can we do? >> well, i think in pakistan, the military, which the people there are called the steel skelton, because it's the one institution of government that really holds the country together. we have to make sure that does not turn against us. that's not going to be anything we can do in a few days or a few months. it's a long-term proposition. if we lose that struggle, though, and the radicals take over in pakistan, they've got dozens, maybe hundreds of nuclear weapons to use against india or to give the terrorist groups that can be used around the world. the stakes are very high around the world, i think today higher than afghanistan or iraq. >> can you -- i mean, we hear from our government that the nuclear arsenal is safe, that it's under control. i don't know why, but i don't feel comfortable with that. can you convince me that that's true? i know that even a.q. khan, is almost like the devil, like the wal-mart of nuclear weapons. he's giving nuclear weapons al
. on his visit to india in 2006, david cameron said he believed it was time for britain and india to forge a new special relationship, focusing particularly on fighting terrorism, protecting the environment, and globalization. india is also leading member of the commonwealth, an organization which has been neglected and undervalued under the labour government in britain. in last year's strategy documents, the only mention of the commonwealth was in the title. it is extraordinary -- it is the unique network of 53 country spanning five continents with 35 of the world's population -- 3 favre% of the world's population. -- 35% of the world's population. a good example of how it could be used is to encourage to take a leading role in addressing state failure, like coordinating a future rehabilitation package for its former member, zimbabwe. if the commonwealth is not the only group of countries where rican recreate historic connections on a new, modern basis. i have long argued that britain should embark on the elevation of its links with many of the countries of the middle east and gulf, not o
, focused on india when they ought to be focused on the jihadists -- >> where do you see it headed? >> i see the united states desperately keeping it from just imploding into civil war. >> very reassuring, evan.  >> yeas are 68, nays are 31. >> the world's greatest deliberative body gives its consent to the first hispanic to serve on the nation's highest court, and the third woman. 31 of the 40 republicans voted no, including orrin hatch. >> such activity, judging with uncertainty and instability in the law, and the result is an activist judicial philosophy that i cannot support, and that the american people rejected. >> if you voted for her, the national rifle association threatens to get your free if you voted against her, you could set yourself up for trouble with hispanic voters. >> john mccain was the biggest surprise to me. when lindsey graham, the senator closest to him on the judiciary committee, came out for her. there were only nine republicans who voted for justice sotomayor. four of them are retiring. i think that in itself is revealing. it remains a concern for republicans, w
unnecessary. on top of that, the huge expansion of economy such as china and india means that in our working lifetimes, the size of the european economy relative to address the world looks set to shrink dramatically. projections have shown europe's share of the world economy declining from 18% to 10% by the middle of the century, and even the united states is not immune from the effect of economic problems. this diminished economic weight will have a major impact on the ability of western nations to achieve their foreign policy goals. we are used to the idea of calling for economic sanctions against nations whose human rights records we find an acceptable. south africa under apartheid being a celebrated example. now we apply them to recalcitrant and regimes. it is already clear that the power of such economic weapons is declining. it follows from this analysis that it will decline much further in the years to come. what is more, much of the economic weight in the world is passing the countries which either do not fully share our concepts of democracy and human rights or for their own reasons
, whether that's new or not, india or pakistan possess nuclear weapons. >> right. >> and as it stands, those are just accepted responsible nations, so-called responsible nations. and then we saw pakistan and india go to war just a few years ago. threatening each other and they were told not to. is it a wise policy now to allow iran, knowing that -- >> to allow -- >> allow iran or to allow po persist or to go ahead with the nuclear armament? knowing that iraq and iran fought each other with the chemical weapons and how iran is threatening other countries in the middle east? and the religious fundamentalists are threatening each other. and now they're trying to contain that but from what i get from yours, it's all a superpower ideology, of course, that is true during the cold war. >> so let me try and answer your question about iranian -- the iranian effort to acquire nuclear weapons assuming that is what they are trying to do. i think we have to look at this in terms of two issues. one is the issue of nuclear proliferation generally and this relates to the faithlessness of the existing nuclea
india. we learned from democrat senator claire mccaskill that, quote, if we go too far with this, that is cap and trade, then all we are going to do is chase more jobs to china and india where they've been putting up coal-fired plants every 10 minutes. in sum, we have a slew of hearings in three unsuccessful votes on the senate floor. actually i'd say four because we rejected the kyoto treaty in the beginning. the democrats taught us that cap and trade is a great big tax and will raise electricity prices on consumers i would have to say in a regressive way, send jobs to china and india all without any impact on global temperature, so off we go into the august recess secure in the knowledge that cap and trade is riddled with flaws and that democrats are seriously divided over one of president obama's top domestic policy priorities. and we also know that according to a recent polling the american public is increasingly unwilling to pay anything, as the polling has shown, to fight global warming. but all this does not mean cap and trade is dead and gone. it's very much alive as demo
are getting word that a 7.6 magnitude earthquake has struck near india's island. this is being felt in a number of countries. we're hearing even tokyo was shaken because of this. it's also called a tsunami watch and that watch covers india, myanmar, thailand, indonesia, bangladesh, as well. so, it could cause quite a bit of damage. we have a tsunami watch for all of those countries. it was a large magnitude quake, a 7.6 magnitude quake near india's island, but it's being felt in a number of countries including right in tokyo. they felt the aftershocks of it. >> wow. betty, there's some other news you're following right now, as well, right? >> absolutely. we want to talk gas prices making a steady upward climb. take a look at this. it's risen every day since july 21st when the national average price per gallon was $2.46. well, today it is up to $2.65, up 19 cents in just 20 days. analysts expect the price to peak as high as $2.70 a gallon, still well below last summer's record high prices. >>> and a wave of deadly bombings in iraq mass left at least 48 people dead and more than 400 i
.s. it sparked massive protests in india. what this is all about coming up. >>> having trouble parallel parking. wait until you see what this kid can do. she wants to make up. we decide to turn in early. we just know. announcer: finding the moment that's right for you both can take some time. that's why cialis gives men with erectile dysfunction options: 36-hour cialis or cialis for daily use. cialis for daily use is a clinically proven low-dose tablet you take every day, so you can be ready anytime the moment is right. tell your doctor about your medical condition and all medications and ask if you're healthy enough for sexual activity. don't take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as this may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. don't drink alcohol in excess with cialis. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long term injury seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than 4 hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision stop taking cialis and call your doctor right away. announcer: cialis for
visit to india in 2006, david cameron said that he believed it was time for britain and india to forge a new special relationship, focusing particularly on fighting terrorism, protecting the environment, and globalization. india is also a leading member of the commonwealth, which has been valued on to the labour -- which as been devalued in the labour gouvernment. it is extraordinary diversity offers some straight, a unique network of 53 countries spanning five continents with 30% of the world's population. we believe the commonwealth is a tool to be picked up and used more often, to help dialogue and conflict prevention, taking a leading role in addressing state failure by coordinating up future rehabilitation package for its former member, zimbabwe. get the commonwealth is not the only group of countries where we can recreate historic connections on a new modern basis. i have long argued that britain should embark on the elevation of its links with many countries of the middle east in the gulf. not only diplomatically, but in matters of culture, education, commerce, and security. thi
of its relationship with india, and most of all feels that this constructive engagement is likely to end, once pakistan ceases to be of strategic use to america. all political groups here asked the u.s. to use soft power and economic growth to resolve the intractable conflict that continues to spread through this region. anita mcnaught, al jazeera in islamabad. >> if you want to get a sense what american diplomats working in pakistan are sometimes up against, consider this account we came across earlier this week in "the new york times." it describes a recent meeting between the obama administration's new under secretary of state for public diplomacy and public affairs, that's judith mchale, and a pakistani journalist. according to the "times," she told him how america wants to build bridges to the muslim world. his response, quoting now, "you should know that we hate all americans. from the bottom of our souls, we hate you." >>> and now to our weekly roundtable. our look back at some of the week's most important international news stories. tonight we'll discuss the presidential election
in the middle of an unstable region. it is surrounded by iran and afghanistan and its rival, india. there are questions about who this new leader is. >> that's right, there are more than one dozen taliban factions in pakistan. one of them is this man. he was supposed to share power with another taliban faction leader. we understand from western and pakistani intelligence officials that he might have been killed by his rival. right now, western intelligence officials are trying to exploit the division in the taliban. >shepard: we are reporting that he wants to have some high- profile attacks. do we have any idea what or where? >> he has made a statement in recent days to say that president obama is their number one enemy. high-profile attacks like the marriott bombing, he is threatening attacks like this according to western intelligence officials. he wants to rally his followers. shepard: jennifer, thank you. the government reports that the cash for clunkers program generated nearly 700,000 car sales. the program offered rebates of up to $4,500 for consumers that traded in gas guzz
, suspicious of its relatiship wi india, and most of all feels thathis constructive engagement is likelyo end, once pakistan cees to be of strategic use to america all political groups he asked the u.s. to use soft per and onomic growth to resolve the intractable confct that contues to spread through this region. anitmcnaught, al jazeera in islamabad, paktan. >> if yowant to get a sense what american diplomats woing in pakistaare sometimes up agnst, consider this account we came across earlier ts week in "the new yo times." it desibes a recent meeting between the obama adnistration's new under secretary of state forublic diplomy and public affairs, that's judith mchale, and a pakistani journali. accoing to the "times," she told him howmerica wants to ild bridges to the muslim world. his response, quotin should know that we hate a amerans. from the bottom of o souls, we te you." >>> and now to o weekly roundtab. our look back at some of t week's mosimportant international newstories. tonight 'll discuss. the esidential election in afghanisn. can it be considered success? what comes next? the o
in december. there are international negotiations. i do not know how to get china and india to come along. if they will go along with it and we will not lose all and we will not lose all manufacturers to china understand, china is the number one and matter of this pollution. not the united states. india is even more adamant about not doing anything. then, we lose our jobs. we want to get china under the umbrella. number two, it takes the 2/3 vote in the united states senate to get it done. there is some protection for our industry and some protection for our consumers if we do it through international treaty. >> glad to see you again today. i am a veteran. i am very proud to be a veteran. [applause] i belong to the american legion. in order for a person to be called a veteran that has to serve in the military, there are lots of people that are called veterans that cannot belong to the american legion. congress after world war roman one set up the american legion. is the largest veterans' organization in the world. we have a lot of people. in order to belong to the american legion, you had
wonder because they are on the other side of pakistan. it would be a good strategic movement if india made the move towards bin laden, if he is still alive. another question, perhaps we are already monitoring bin laden? perhaps our intelligence has him on the phone all the time? could that be possible? guest: i wish it were, but it would speak to some kind of nefarious plot. if he were on the phone and we have not killed him. if we are listening to him on the phone we can geo-locate him and he would be yesterday's news. so, i seriously doubt we're listening to him. secondly, part of the problem we have in afghanistan is we have already allowed a large indian presence, both economically, and they are doing a lot of construction with people dressed as civilians but who are really military engineers. people in the u.s. do not realize the degree of paranoia between two nuclear-armed countries, pakistan and india. to allow an indian military forces into pakistan would turn the pakistan knees entirely away from us. -- the pakistanis away from us. it is interesting as an idea, but in the lon
. torrential rains are also causing havoc in india. at least 43 people were killed in landslides in three remote villages in the himalayan foothi foothills. the region has become prone to such disaster because of the >>> as so many children repair for a new school year, are they already a step behind? why some stay students shouldn't have taken a summer off. >>> and 40 years after the manson murders, should two now be set free? >>> and then later here, so much for that saying "if you sneeze, ighte thtoe way to get ahead at work. how about a swim? i'm a little irregular today. don't you eat activia? for my little issues? they')re not that bad. summer' no time to put up with even occasional digestive problems. believe me, once they go away, it's mazing howtgood yo. announcer: activia is clinically proven to help regulate your digestive system in two weeks. summer' a wastin')... takeit works, or it's free.now./ ♪ activia so, what's the problem? these are hot. we're shipping 'em everywhere. but we can't predict our shipping costs. dallas. detroit. different rates. well with us, it's the sam
not expect is a person who is not literate coming from india and trying to do medical, but you expect someone to a college in india that they can't afford to treat and being able to buy a ticket. that would be more of a phenomenon against the most educated -- i amongst the most educated. that would be another example. there are about 400,000 births comprising about one out of every 10 births in the u.s.. what percentage of people who are women, who arrived pregnant? -- what percentage of people or women who arrived pregnant? it is hard to get a handle on how big that is potentially. as robert pointed out, if you do not verify, which is what this new bill considers, that could grow much larger. >> i would consider the precedents for medical tourism to be quite strong indeed. in the 1980's and 1990's, we allowed elderly immigrants to come and then get on your program called supplemental security income. in fact, elderly immigrants coming to the u.s. to retire on this welfare program, it was the fastest growing element in u.s. welfare. it was absolutely unprecedented. what we found, and we had t
they tend to move them around because they fear a pre-emptive attack from india. so they move these weapons around and if there were an insider to help the terrorists get ahold of one of these weapons while in transit that's a definite problem but again the problem is inside not blasting their way in to a nuclear base. >> talking about those who might be blasting their way in, the president said he is confident the u.s. could make sure the arsenal is secure because the army recognizes the hazards of weapons falling in 0 the wrong hands be you have if people inside, who are muslims or supporters of taliban isn't that a problem with some in the military they could be supportive of the terrorists as well? >> sure. we don't expect the president to say anything else. we won't say he is worried an the security of the weapons or where they are. we are worried about religious penetration of the lab and its work force. that's the big worry. the point i made in my column today, no number of predator drones can find the secret agents inside of there. technology has its limits and what we need are good
people injured. the first earthquake was a magnitude 7.6 in indian ocean near india's andaman islands. the second quake was a 6.5 magnitude near tokyo. tsunami warnings issued but later taken back. >>> the same state senator called for sanford to resign after having an affair and now this republican calls for sanford to resign after book in first class flights to european. and he says they are wrong. >>> police are looking for man holding a gown a woman's head during a bank robbery. it shows the man pointing a gun toward a teller and threatens to take a customer hostage. the woman was able to get away but the suspect did take some money. >>> talk about somehow getting lost in translation. secretary state hillary clinton got angry during a q&a session with congolese university student. the student speaking in french asked what president obama would think about chinese financial contracts with congo. but the translator apparently made a mistake and asked secretary clinton what mr. clinton would think. that didn't go over very well. >> you want me to tell you what my husband thinks? my h
promoting a film about racial profiling. people were really upset about this in india. the indian government said it is taking this up with the u.s. embassy there. a u.s. customs official told the associated press that the questioning was part of a routine process. >>> a group the veterans got the welcome they missed when they returned home from vietnam. this special ceremony was held at ft. campbell, kentucky. many vets say when they originally came back from vietnam, they were often met with angry protestors and not welcome home ceremonies. a spokesman for ft. campbell says he hopes there are more ceremonies like this one at other bases. >>> a possible tornado ripped up trees and tossed around cars. this is in southern florida. according to local reports, 23 homes in cape coral were damaged. there were also three fires because of lightning. neighbors met yesterday cleaning up the damage. >> the power was out. we couldn't close the garage door and stuff was flying in the garage and sucking out of the garage. it was crazy. >> as everything swirled and slapped around, things were over here. t
considering countries in the region like pakistan or india or russia or china? >> the commander -- this is a commander's review of his area of responsibility, which is limited to afghanistan. that is what this assessment is on. it is an assessment of the situation on the ground as general mcchrystal and his team see it. >> we're looking at additional more troops -- >> i am laughing at the hammering and drilling. >> president karzai was saying they might need additional resources. >> if it is determined by the commander that he needs additional resources to complete his mission, that request will be made to the normal chain of command. it will go up through cencom, be validated along the way, and the secretary will make a determination whether or not he recommends to the president additional troops. . . . ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ >> is a secretary in touch with countries like india for additional resources? >> i don't know of any communication with india. if he is satisfied with the progress, and i don't think anybody is satisfied with progress, i think wh
to expand its capability to strike land targets. that is a potential threat to india, according to senior administration and congressional officials. meanwhile, there is a related store this morning on the front page of "the washington post," with this headline -- the u.s. says metrics to assess or success. -- war success. back to your calls come stan from oklahoma, is this the scary season for obama? caller: yes, it is. i think there is much to begin. as much as i was impressed with the personal tributes to senator kennedy yesterday from his family, particularly, i think there is something unseemly about the emphasis on health care bill. i know that he passionately wants to get something approved, but there is much work to be done. we cannot ignore the fact that the majority of american people do not approve of the health plan as it is now. host: let me read you something based on the republican radio address from a mike enzi. this is in both the washington post and the new york times. a republican member of the senate's gang of six healthcare negotiators sharply criticized democratic su
, one hears that the russians have been selling more advanced weapons to india, they have also sold some advanced weapons to malaysia and i understand indonesia. they have, obviously, a deep oblem with japan because of the northern territories, but nevertheless, if the rusans were to see their relationship with china as in some respects inhibited, aren't the assets avaible to the russians to, if you like, increase their livery somewhat? >> well, the russians have been trying to exercise those. they understand that, and so, for example, the arms relationship was always something that implicitly if the tensions became worse, the russians could do what the united states did after tiananmen which was cut that off. but now the chise can develop a lot of this stuff indigenously, so that leverages decline. the oil and gas we discussed, it's something that russia's been trying to use to, say, threaten or not threaten but really just bargain off china and japan and other countries to get them to pay higher prices, and the chinese for a while, you know, pretty much stood on their terms. now the ru
. host: hobart, indiana. george on the india line. caller: good morning, gentlemen. glad you took my call. i just don't understand for one thing, mr. pappas. how come there is no flexibility between the parties when i have -- my wife and i have two insurance companies, employer insurance companies and we are consumed almost virtually 20% of our gross income, we are not talking about shared costs. or pharmaceutical or anything catastrophic that would happen to us. we are still going to be placed into bankruptcy. why isn't there some sort of consideration? why can't the two chambers of the house come to some sort of compromise to where we are put in a sunset or triggering mechanism to where we could try this new system of universal healthcare coverage? i don't want to use socialism because it is such a key word, a buzzword for a lot of medicaid and medicare people. they think that they are not part of the socialist medicine group. guest: what george just shared with us, i think, is very important and it reminds me of my parents' own situation. my parents live in massachusetts where they ha
in india, and an awful lot of the doctors doing it were educated here. >> but does the president have to look beyond the rich for taxes? >> well, yeah. there's just -- the middle class bears the real burden here. that's why the middle class is getting hurt. and what you keep hearing, i take the subway in the morning, and people, everybody talks about what their complaints are. it's new york. and paying taxes is something nobody likes. now, they like the services that taxes pay for, but you have to have the burden -- everybody's going to have to sacrifice, everody's going to have to reach in their pocket if we're going to have a city and country of the future. >> does he have to reconsider that promise not to raise taxes on the middle class? >> i think we'll see down the road. in the end, the president has to deal with the reality and some of the things are beyond his control. he makes commitments, and he tries to live up to them, and i think the courage of being able to say, look, the world is different than what i anticipated or what it was before and i'm going to have to face that,
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